Saturday, 29 July 2017

Love Letter to Soho - Out Traveler

https://www.outtraveler.com/london/2017/6/30/love-letter-soho-daniel-lismore

My Modern Met Article

Fashion-Forward Artist Expresses Vibrant Personality in Elaborate Wearable Sculptures


For many people, getting dressed can be an uneventful chore. But for London-based artist Daniel Lismore, selecting garments and layering accessories allows him to express his vibrant, multidimensional personality. We’re not talking jeans and different t-shirts, either. Lismore dresses in extravagant ensembles that highlight his unique sartorial point of view and sculptural approach to clothing. Clad in intricate headdresses, art history inspired frocks, and a bevy of baubles, Lismore’s distinct looks are impeccably styled. In addition, he’s done up with a doll-like application of makeup and then documents it all through self-portrait photography.

Self Portrait Photography Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
To create these unforgettable outfits and images, Lismore combines “haute couture with charity-shop finds.” Vintage fabrics, found objects, ribbons, feathers, shells, and chain mail are just some of the raw materials that are draped and arranged into a cohesive outfit. Often, this is achieved through a limited color palette,which allows the textures of each look to shine.
The taste maker—whose famous friends include Debbie Harry, Boy George, and Vivienne Westwood—is the subject of a recent book called Daniel Lismore: Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken. It’s his first major publication that features the essence of his creative soul—30 ensembles that reference a variety of historical, social, and cultural themes from across the globe. It’s now available through Amazon.

Artist Daniel Lismore dresses in elaborate sculptural ensembles that highlight his vibrant, multidimensional personality.

Self Portrait Photography Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Photography Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Photography Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Photography Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
Self Portrait Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli

Lismore's amazing fashions are chronicled in his book, Daniel Lismore: Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken.

Self Portrait Photography Daniel Lismore
Photo: © Colin Douglas Gray/Rizzoli
My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by SCAD




Friday, 28 July 2017

Gay Times Article




WORDS simon button

Dressing however the hell he damn well pleases means life isn’t plain sailing for Daniel Lismore. “I’ve experience homophobia,” the fashion maverick sighs. “I’ve experience transphobia. I’ve experienced all kinds of hate for the way I am, in London, around the UK and online.” He knows why that it happens. “People don’t get it and they feel they have to say something, but those are the people that don’t matter in your life. My friends go, ‘How on earth do you ignore it?’ But I honestly don’t see it anymore. If someone said something awful about a friend I’d jump straight on them, but if they say something about me I’m like, ‘OK, that’s your opinion but I don’t agree and I’ve got better things to do.’ ” That said, Daniel, 32, recalls wearing drag and walking through Soho with New Romantics godfather Steve Strange when a guy spat on him five times and punched him. “So I beat him up and he was crying. If someone hits me I’m not going to stop.” Sounding far from proud of himself for retaliating, he gives another longer sigh. “I’m lucky that I’m 6ft 4ins and I can defend myself, but it’s a part of me I don’t really want to use and I wouldn’t recommend it. You never know what’s going to happen in those situations so I’d advise to try and get away from it as fast as you can.” Defiantly, the man who wears everything from medieval garb to tribal gear via designer bin liners and regal crowns has no intention of tempering his image. “We need characters right now,” he tells us. “We need people who will break out of a mould, like in the 80s when we had Boy George and people coming out of hard times and just being themselves. That’s when change happens. For years I’ve been put down by the art world and fashion and society, mainly by people who have never met me or spoken to me. It’s not easy being different, but it’s worth it.” As one of the stars of our style issue, Daniel has wide parameters when it comes to defining style. “It’s your own personal idea. People too often judge what other people are wearing, but actually if you just put something on and you feel OK in it, and you want to present yourself to the world like that, then that’s up to you.” The way he presents himself to the world has earned him the oft-repeated moniker of ‘world’s most outrageous dresser’, which was coined by the editors of Vogue and now crops up every time he’s written about. How does he plead? “Not guilty! I don’t think the way I dress is outrageous. If you look at tribes around the world they’re very similar.” A fan and friend of Boy George, who has penned a poem for the companion book to his exhibition Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken, Daniel believes the LGBT+ community are still very much trendsetters. We’ve always stood out and been a bit different, he feels, partly as a way to identify each other. “And since it’s been accepted for guys to be gay, since we were told we could be a certain way, there’s a lot more of that. Everyone follows us.” You might wonder if his everevolving, hard-to-categorise is the boy from Bournemouth who grew into one of the biggest names in the British fashion industry. Hot off the heels of his new book, Daniel talks styling the likes of Cara Delevingne and Mariah Carey, working with giants such as Vivienne Westwood, inspiring Gaga, and how we can all use fashion to stand in the way of control. STYLE look is a little too out-there for people to copy. “But I’m imitated all the time,” he insists, “either by small groups around the world – kids or whatever – or ladies in Sweden. I see stylists taking inspiration from me for shoots, or you see your influence in fashion shows.” He laughs about his ideas leaking into pop culture. “Iggy Azalea, Lady Gaga and all those – they stole my looks.” His new book could serve as a reference manual for such style thieves. It features the 32 ensembles Daniel created for his exhibition, which premiered at the SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion and Film in Atlanta, and was also featured at Art Basel in Miami. Daniel reels off a list of people who have provided quotes for the book – including Stephen Fry, Debbie Harry, Yves Saint Laurent and Matt Lucas, with an essay by fashion guru Hilary Alexander. He’s got them all on speed dial, apparently, although he might not have time to call them during what looks like being a very busy year. Having stepped down as creative director of atelier Sorapol label late last year, he declares: “I’m branching out on my own. I want to conquer the art world.” There are a lot of TBC things he can’t talk about, plus a perfume that has to be finalised and named. He’s also an ambassador for the Tate Modern and plans to take his exhibition around the world. Among the people he’d like to work with and design for are Scarlett Johansson, Mila Kunis and Angelina Jolie. “They’re power women who I really admire and they’re so sexy.” He laughs. “But then I want to dress the rest of the world.” He’s clothed Nicki Minaj, recalling: “She was quite tricky because she changed her mind all the time, with all these crazy and elaborate ideas, but she was a total dream to dress. Her body is beautiful, so to create stuff for her was great.” And Sorapol made a coat for Mariah Carey, raving: “She’s super-sharp and so intelligent. There’s a reason she’s gone so far in her career.” Then there was the time he dressed Azealia Banks and Cara Delevingne as mermaids and walked with them through the London Aquarium. “They were shuffling along and it was very funny. Neither of them could move and I was thinking, ‘This is ridiculous.’” Daniel’s style icons include Stephen Fry “because he’s always so dandy” and Isabella Blow, Philip Treacy’s muse who told him: “Always wear red lipstick and don’t give a flip about what people think.” Born in Bournemouth, the boy who went on to study fashion and photography and became a model at age 17 recalls being inspired by image-makers like David LaChapelle. “When I was a kid seeing his work kind of blew my mind.” And he loves Vivienne Westwood, who he’s collaborated with on climate change and human rights projects, “because she changes the world via clothes and that’s what I’m about”. Does he feel like a role model for the LGBT+ community? Daniel ponders the question, then answers: “It’s not just LGBT+, it’s anyone who’s a bit different or thinks differently or wants to be different.” As the first brand ambassador for Illamasqua make-up, he adds: “If you look at their make-up it’s for people who are not living within boxed ideas.” He doesn’t think the community has lost its edge. Far from it in fact. “Ten years ago it was a very different world but now there are new groups happening and new scenes and new ideas. And LGBT+ people are blended in more now so they’re able to influence more scenes rather than just art, music and fashion.” Does tireless self-promotion ever get tiring? “Never,” Daniel declares. “I think social media is fantastic and I’m just sharing my life with the world and I’m sharing it truthfully. It never gets tiring and there’s no off button because it’s real.” l Daniel Lismore: Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken is published by Skira Rizzoli, priced £40, daniellismore.blogspot.com, @daniellismore

Thursday, 20 July 2017

V&A Museum Talk with Hilary Alexander - 'Be Yourself'







Making 3D Printed Art

iMakr recently had an opportunity to work with London artist Daniel Lismore on an amazing project driven by its brand Mini You, that included all the services provided by the company: scanning, designing and printing.
After exposing his 3D sculptures in US, Daniel needed an expert to give shape to his ideas for a new project to be featured at the Biennale Arte 2017 in Venice, as part of the Extraterrestrial Odyssey exhibition.
When he spotted the iMakr shop located in Clerkenwell Road, he immediately saw the opportunity of a collaboration.
Daniel made his unforgettable appearance at iMakr’s HQ on the 18th of April, where he communicated to our experts his concept through a basic sketch, that Jonathan Goslan, Mini You Manager and 3D Designer, turned into two incredible life size sculptures which integrated Daniel’s outlines with alien’s features.
The process started with a photogrammetry scan of Daniel’s face and bust, in order to give his appearance to the two sculptures commissioned. The artist wore hand made art works of couture embroidery made the project with metallic applications for the first scan, leading to the realization of “Bust 1”, and a tassels covered garment to be reproduced in “Bust 2”.
                
 
Subsequently, Daniel’s head was digitally combined and merged with a 3D model of a neck’s spine.
“The main challenge of this project was the large size of the sculptures, measuring 560 mm in height and 500 mm in width; the printing process, indeed, required the busts to be printed in separated parts, using multiple machines”, said Jonathan.
The engineering team provided a great contribution to the printing phase from the London’s iMakr store, working on the entire first sculpture and part of the second one.
For “Bust 1”, Daniel’s jawline and head were elongated to give the sculpture an alien look; some dragon teeth and a broken chest skeleton were also added to the artist’s dress. A whole miniature skeleton was incorporated in the “Bust 2” garment, which tassels, flowers and pearls resulted in a noisy scan.
         
 
In Jonathan’s words, the experience was an “extraordinary achievement in such a short time”.
The entire process, indeed, from scanning, designing, digital sculpting and printing, to finishing touch and delivery, was extremely fast and efficient: it was concluded in only 22 days, thanks to our fast and skilled Jonathan.
Daniel is sharing his experience with iMakr’s Mini You with all of his many influential friends.
The alien busts will be exposed at Palazzo Pisani till the 26th of November 2017.


 The Extraterrestrial Odyssey Exhibition - Palazzo Pisani, Venice Biennale.

Circuit ambassador at Tate



 British fashion designer and stylist Daniel Lismore, joins BBC Radio 1 DJ Clara Amfo as the newest ambassador for the national Circuit programme in its final year. Led by Tate and funded by Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Circuit is a four-year programme for 15–25 year olds built on Tate’s long-term work with young people, often with the least access to museums and galleries. Circuit invites young people to the arts through festivals, partnerships and peer-led programming and is delivered across the four Tate galleries and partners from the Plus Tate network: Firstsite, Colchester; MOSTYN, Llandudno; Nottingham Contemporary; The Whitworth, Manchester; and Wysing Arts Centre and Kettleʼs Yard, Cambridgeshire.
Circuit ambassadors Daniel Lismore and Clara Amfo will both play a part in the Circuit programme. A new series of Circuit festivals partner at galleries Firstsite and MOSTYN.

 New Circuit ambassador Daniel Lismore Daniel Lismore has a unique approach to personal style and self expression and is Creative Director of fashion label Sorapol. He is a champion of ethical and sustainable fashion and is widely recognized as one of Britain’s most eccentric dressers and daring fashion figures. To celebrate his role as the newest Circuit ambassador, Daniel joined members of Tate Collective London at Tate Britain, ahead of Late at Tate Britain: Mantra, on Friday 7 October, the fourth event in the 2016 series curated by young people as part of the Circuit programme.

Daniel Lismore said: Young people across the UK have really grabbed the opportunity to express themselves through the Circuit events they’ve masterminded over the past three years – fashion, art and music are so influenced by youth culture, it makes too much sense for young people to step up and put their own personal touch and creativity out into gallery spaces to be seen by as many people as possible. I’m excited to be a part of this landmark programme and I can’t wait to see what the young curators come up with for the new Circuit festivals.

 Mark Miller, Circuit Programme National Lead said: Daniel is an excellent addition to our ambassador lineup; a true champion of inclusivity across the arts, and a young self-starter whose creativity has taken him to extraordinary heights, Daniel is a great example to Circuit young people of what is possible when you dare to turn your creative ideas into a reality. Our aim with Circuit was to demonstrate what young people can do and, provide them with the tools and guidance to do it – four years later, the programme has achieved significant positive impact for young people and the partner galleries. Our legacy programme in 2017 will be further testament to all the hard work, creative vision and personal development that’s taken place in the lives of these young people nationwide.

 About Circuit Circuit is a four year national programme connecting 15–25 year olds to the arts in galleries and museums working in partnership with the youth and cultural sector. Led by Tate and funded by Paul Hamlyn Foundation, it provides opportunities for young people to steer their own learning and create cultural activity across art disciplines. Circuit involves Tate Modern and Tate Britain; Tate Liverpool; Tate St Ives and partners from the Plus Tate network: Firstsite, Colchester; MOSTYN, Llandudno; Nottingham Contemporary; The Whitworth, Manchester; and Wysing Arts Centre and Kettleʼs Yard, Cambridgeshire. https://circuit.tate.org.uk/

 About Paul Hamlyn Foundation Paul Hamlyn Foundation was established in 1987 by the publisher and philanthropist Paul Hamlyn (1926–2001). Today it is one of the largest independent grant-making foundations in the UK. The Foundation’s mission is to help people overcome disadvantage and lack of opportunity, so that they can realise their potential and enjoy fulfilling and creative lives. It has a particular interest in supporting young people and a strong belief in the importance of the arts. www.phf.org.uk

 About Plus Tate Plus Tate, established in 2010, is a partnership, which brings Tate together with 34 organisations across the UK. The Plus Tate partners are: Arnolfini, Bristol; Artes Mundi, Cardiff; BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead; Camden Arts Centre; Centre for Contemporary Art Derry-Londonderry; Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art, Manchester; Chisenhale Gallery, London; Cornerhouse, Manchester; Firstsite, Colchester; The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh; Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast; Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea; Grizedale Arts, Coniston, Cumbria; Harris Museum and Art Gallery, Preston; The Hepworth Wakefield; Ikon, Birmingham; John Hansard Gallery, Southampton; Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge; Liverpool Biennial; The MAC, Belfast; MK Gallery, Milton Keynes; Modern Art Oxford; mima, Middlesbrough; MOSTYN, Llandudno; Newlyn Art Gallery and The Exchange, Penzance; Nottingham Contemporary; The Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Sunderland; The Pier Arts Centre, Stromness, Orkney; The South London Gallery; Spike Island, Bristol; Towner, Eastbourne; Turner Contemporary, Margate; the Whitworth Manchester; and Wysing Arts Centre, Bourn, Cambridgeshire.